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The Great Start-Up Theory of History

September 1, 2011

Sentences to contemplate about Steve Jobs’ retirement:

I speak often about the big sweep of history, particularly how relentless economic growth changes the human condition.  And I almost always call out Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak because their story represents a stunning refutation of the consensus paradigm of progress that held sway over serious thinkers for almost all of the 20th century, certainly the middle five decades.  Even Joseph Schumpeter, the celebrated prophet of innovation and champion of the heroic entrepreneur believed that the new era would inevitably see the dominance of corporatism and its efficient R&D labs.  Not until the rise of Silicon Valley and its startup culture affirmed the pioneering success of Apple did the consensus shift, quietly, as if nothing had changed. The recognition of startups, not governments, as the central actors in economic history should not be neglected after you turn this page.

In the next century, will start-up countries become the central actors in political history?

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One Comment
  1. twistedone151 permalink
    September 12, 2011 12:04 am

    “In the next century, will start-up countries become the central actors in political history?”

    No, they won’t. Nor in the century after that, nor in the century after that one, nor…

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